History

A Grandson remembers Dr Sarto Esteves

A Grandson remembers Dr Sarto Esteves

By Anish Esteves

Issue no. 13

Sarto Esteves was born in Solvá, Raia, Goa, then a Portuguese colony, on the 28th of August, 1919 to Roque Piedade Felicio Esteves and Argentina Maria Esmeralda Geneciana de Piedade Quadros e Esteves. He was one of nine children in the family. He lost his parents at a very young age and later came to Mumbai for his education.

Fitz de Souza's Memoir: Busting Myths

Fitz de Souza's Memoir: Busting Myths

By Selma Carvalho

Issue no. 13

Fitz must have deliberated long and hard on whether to make public these charges. As a researcher I have no way of verifying them. They might indeed be taken out of context. I too, have wrestled with my conscience whether to draw further attention to them. Nonetheless, the allegations are now part of our public discourse.

Early Indians: Deconstructing DNA

Early Indians: Deconstructing DNA

By Selma Carvalho

Issue no. 12

There was one other thing, my DNA results told me. They provided me with a long list of people, I may be related to. My closest cousin was identified as a Fernandes, many 4th cousins were identified as Costa, Figueiredo, Barreto, Marquis, etc, but this is where it gets interesting: among my 6th and 8th cousins were a Shenvi and Pai.

Luso-Indians: A Mandarin Class

Luso-Indians: A Mandarin Class

By Selma Carvalho

Issue no. 11

Shirley L. Gonsalves’s book The Luso-Indian Stethoscope (Goa 1556, 2019), is an extraordinarily incisive look at the mandarin class the empires of Britain and Portugal created in the Indian subcontinent, and how these early transnationals heralded the golden age of intellectualism and public philanthropy.

The Letters of C. E. U. Bremner: Same Old Tired Prejudices

The Letters of C. E. U. Bremner: Same Old Tired Prejudices

By Selma Carvalho

Issue no. 10

Pacing his office, badly served by his predecessor and left in a ‘chaotic condition,’ Lieutenant-Colonel Bremner knew nothing good would come of his posting to Goa. Outside lay a land shorn of adventure, a land whose weather he found to be ‘unbearably sultry,’ whose Southern European colonisers spent their time in ‘cheery inebriation’ …

The Knight in the Many Lives of Vamona Navelcar

The Knight in the Many Lives of Vamona Navelcar

By Jugneeta Sudan

Issue no. 8

Quixotically Vamona read chivalrous texts passionately and then implemented the ethos into his existence. Regrettably, reality had moved away and become inequitable, random and prejudiced. It did not share his faith in codes of chivalry. Every time he was subjected to physical abuse and psychic tortures, he drew courage from his readings …

Short Memoir: Young Under the Apple Boughs

Short Memoir: Young Under the Apple Boughs

By Lawrence Nazareth

Issue no. 8

Nairobi grew progressively, from a railway station and frontier town into the capital city of a newly-established colony, the forested fringe had given way to segregated, residential suburbs; for example, Parklands and Muthaiga, where only immigrants of European origin were permitted to live.

Excursions to 'The South'

Excursions to 'The South'

By Clifford Pereira

Issue no. 7

Growing up in rural Kenya in the 1960s and 70s, my knowledge of South Africa was filtered through the politics of the day, inflected as they were by East Africa’s independence from British rule. Looking back, I cannot help but wonder if the information I received about other parts of the continent arose due to the different colonial histories ...

The Bayingyi People of Burma

The Bayingyi People of Burma

By Yvonne Vaz Ezdani

Issue no. 7

She told me she came from the Bayingyi community, descendants of the Portuguese, many of whom had come from Goa several hundreds of years ago, and had settled in the Valley of the Mu River area where she lived. She also described the place as a colony of Catholics.